Towns, Cities, Villages and Hamlets

Great Wilbraham

Samuel Lewis's Topographical Gazeetter 1831

WILBRAHAM (GREAT), a parish in the hundred of STAINE, county of CAMBRIDGE, 7¼ miles (E. by S.) from Cambridge, containing 495 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Ely, rated in the king’s books at £11. 18. 4., endowed with £200 private benefaction, and £200 royal bounty, and in the patronage of Mrs. Hicks. The church, dedicated to St. Nicholas, is a cruciform structure, with a tower at the west end; it had orginally a tower rising from the centre. The manor-house, an ancient building formerly belonging to the Knights Templars, is still called the Temple.

For the Family Historian details of available records can be found on the Great Wilbraham page of GENUKI Cambridgeshire.

GREAT WILBRAHAM is a parish and village, 2 miles south from the Cambridge and Newmarket road, 1½ east by north from Fulbourn station on the Cambridge and Bury branch of the London and North Eastern railway and 7 east from Cambridge, in the hundred of Staine, Bottisham petty sessional division, union of Chesterton, county court district of Cambridge, rural deanery of Quy and archdeaconry and diocese of Ely.

The church of St. Nicholas is an ancient building of flint, principally in the Early English and Perpendicular styles, consisting of chancel, nave, transepts, south porch and an embattled western tower of Perpendicular date with pinnacles, and containing a clock and 5 bells the chancel retains a piscina and sedilia and a curious aumbry: the font, which dates from the year 1150, is Transition Norman: in the chancel are inscribed tablets to the Ward family from 1719: at the west end are some ancient tombstones; the church, with the exception of the nave and north transept, was restored in 1878-9, at a cost of £800, and the tower in 1882-3, at a cost of about £600: there are 300 sittings. The register dates from the year 1561.

The church like that of Wendy in this county, was originally given to the monks of Ely, but they, for some consideration, made it over to the Knights Templars, who made a habitation here for some of their order: the estates were afterwards passed over to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. There is a small Baptist chapel here.

The soil is various; subsoil, stone and clunch. The chief crops are wheat, barley and roots. The area is 2,921 acres; the population in 1921 was 444.

[Extracts from Kelly's Directory - Cambridgeshire - 1929]

Domesday Book Entry

*** To be completed ***


Military History

The men and women on the war memorial are fully documented with military details, photographs and personal details.

 

 

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