Towns, Cities, Villages and Hamlets

Kingston

Samuel Lewis's Topographical Gazeetter 1831

KINGSTON, a parish in the hundred of LONGSTOW, county of CAMBRIDGE, 3¾ miles (E. S. E ) from Caxton, containing 278 inhabitants, The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Ely, rated in the kings books at 11. 15. 5., and in the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The church is dedicated to Saints and St. Andrew. Here were anciently a market and two fairs. A charity school was Founded, in 1702, by Mr. Francis Todd, who endowed it with a rent-charge of about 13.

For the Family Historian details of available records can be found on the Kingston page of GENUKI Cambridgeshire.

Domesday Book Entry

*** To be transcribed ***

War Memorial

The war memorial and the men on it have been documented on the Roll of Honour website for Cambridgeshire pages.

KINGSTON is a parish about 8 miles north from Royston station on the Hitchin, Royston and Cambridge line of the London and North Eastern railway, 4 miles east from the Old North Road station on the Bedford and Cambridge branch of the London, Midland and Scottish railway and 8 south-west from Cambridge, in the hundred of Longstow, petty sessional division of Caxton, union of Caxton and Arrington, county court district of Cambridge, rural deanery of Bourn and archdeaconry and diocese of Ely.

The church of All Saints and St. Andrew is a structure of rubble in the Decorated and Perpendicular styles, and consists of chancel, clerestoried nave, aisles, south porch and an embattled western tower with turret on the north side and containing 2 bells; the north well of the chancel retains a small recess, probably a reliquary, and on both sides are arches with plate tracery: there is an ancient chancel screen, beautifully carved, and a Decorated font with octagonal basin, supported on low shafts with trefoiled arches under crocketed canopies, and a fine old Jacobean pulpit: the arcades of the nave are Perpendicular: the church chest is of rude construction, with strong iron work: the church was restored in 1895 at a cost of £1,600, and affords 130 sittings. The register dates from the year 1570.

This place had formerly a market on Thursdays, granted in 1305 to Sir Constantine Mortimer, together with two fairs, one at the festival of St. Margaret, for six days, the other for three days at the festival of St. Luke: the market and fairs have long since become obsolete.

The soil is clay and gravel; subsoil, gault. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 1,907 acres the population in 1921 was 173.

[Extracts from Kelly's Directory - Cambridgeshire - 1929]

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